News

In May, four students were recognized for their outstanding achievements. They are Sara Fuertes-Smith, Kristen Mejia, Maria Vargas Aguilar, and Karli Wachtel.

The Department of Political Science and Latin American and Latino Studies (LALS) Program at Lehigh University seek to hire an Assistant Professor to begin in the fall term of the 2018 academic year. The position will be a joint appointment in Political Science (the department of tenure) and LALS. We are looking for a colleague with a demonstrated record of achievement in U.S. domestic Latinx Studies (in such areas as Latinx and Caribbean communities, Latinx civic engagement, immigration, labor issues, and gender studies) and/or comparative Latin American politics with a focus on transnationalism in Latino communities. The candidate should be committed to creative scholarship and teaching which complement and augment the LALS program’s interdisciplinary strengths. The normal teaching load for this position is two courses each semester, which will be cross-listed in political science and LALS.

Latin American and Latino Studies is proud of our senior who graduated in May. Congratulations and much success to Jason Artiles, Ceara Tomaino, and Karen Valerio.

We're proud of our graduating seniors!
Elif Anda
Michael Asser
Maria Cuenca
Marisa Haggar
Juan Palacio Moreno
Nathalie Rebatta
Benjamin Shepherd
Kendall Wilkins
Silvia Zhagui 

Melodrama, says Matthew Bush, does not get the respect it deserves in the world of literature.

Current LAS Postdoctoral Fellow, Javier Puente Valdivia has accepted a tenure-track position as Assistant Professor at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. The UC is one of Latin America's premier research institutions and Javier will join their Institute of History this summer.

Congratulations to Professor Matthew Bush, Director of Latin American Studies on the publication of his book, Pragmatic Passions: Melodrama and Latin American Social Narrative From the era of the wars for independence onward, the emotionally heightened and ethically charged theatrics of melodrama have played a substantial role in the framing of Latin American fictional narrative. Over that same time period, melodramatic reasoning has influenced the critical models through which the countries of the region conceive their respective histories and political landscapes. Pragmatic Passions: Melodrama and Latin American Social Narrative demonstrates how melodrama is deployed as a convincing means of affectively narrating socio-political messages, yet how it also unwittingly undermines the narrative structure of paradigmatic works by Rómulo Gallegos, César Vallejo, Roberto Arlt, Jorge Amado, and Carlos Fuentes. 

Greater Lehigh Valley Chamber of Commerce will be honoring Professor Viera at their upcoming Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of the Lehigh Valley Annual Gala on Saturday, October 11. 

Barbara Zepeda Cortes, Assistant Professor of History and Latin American Studies 
 

Congratulations to Javier Puente, LAS Pre/Postdoctoral Fellow, on the successful defense of his dissertation entitled "Closer Apart: Indigenous and Peasant Communities and the State in Capitalist Peru, 1700-1990."

Congradulations to Jaime Pensado, former LAS Postdoctoral Fellow, on the publication of his book Rebel MexicoIn the middle of the twentieth century, a growing tide of student activism in Mexico reached a level that could not be ignored, culminating with the 1968 movement. This book traces the rise, growth, and consequences of Mexico's "student problem" during the long sixties (1956-1971). Historian Jaime M. Pensado closely analyzes student politics and youth culture during this period, as well as reactions to them on the part of competing actors.Examining student unrest and youthful militancy in the forms of sponsored student thuggery (porrismo), provocation, clientelism (charrismo estudiantil), and fun (relajo), Pensado offers insight into larger issues of state formation and resistance. He draws particular attention to the shifting notions of youth in Cold War Mexico and details the impact of the Cuban Revolution in Mexico's universities. In doing so, Pensado demonstrates the ways in which deviating authorities—inside and outside the government—responded differently to student unrest, and provides a compelling explanation for the longevity of the Partido Revolucionario Institucional..

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