Events Archive

Thursday, November 9, 2017 - 6:00pm
Zoellner Arts Center, LUAG Lower Gallery
Curator and scholar Lowery Stokes Sims will speak in conjunction with the exhibition The Drawings of Wifredo Lam: 1940-1955. Join us in the LUAG Lower Gallery in Zoellner Arts Center, 6PM.  Reception to follow.  All LUAG events are free and open to the public. Sponsored in part by the Visiting Lecturers Committee and Africana Studies.
 
A specialist in modern and contemporary art Lowery Stokes Sims is known for her particular interest in a diverse and inclusive global art world and has supported a variety of artists whose identities and work reflect those values. A curator and scholar in contemporary art, craft and design her particular expertise lies in the work of African, Latino, Native and Asian American artists. Her PhD thesis Wifredo Lam and the International Avant-Garde, 1923-1982 was published by the University of Texas Press in 2002. She recently retired as Curator Emerita from the Museum of Arts and Design in New York where she served as the Charles Bronfman International Curator and the William and Mildred Ladson Chief Curator. Sims served on the education and curatorial staff of The Metropolitan Museum of Art from 1972-1999 and as executive director, president and adjunct curator for the permanent collection at The Studio Museum in Harlem from 2000-2007.
 
For more information about Lowery Stokes Sims, click here.
 
Co-sponsored by Latin American and Latino Studies, The Visiting Lecturers Committee, Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and Africana Studies
Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - 4:10pm
Roemmele Global Commons, Williams Hall
Latin American and Latino Studies | Post-Sabbatical Talk
María Bárbara Zepeda-Cortés
Assistant Professor, Department of History
Wednesday, November 8 at 4:10pm—Roemmele Global Commons, Williams Hall
 
Beginning in the mid-sixteenth century, Spain claimed sovereignty over California. Two hundred years later, however, and excluding sixteen Jesuit missionaries and a few supporting settlers, the Spanish presence in this vast territory of northwestern New Spain was practically non-existent. This changed in the 1760s, when two competing visions of California emerged. One portrayed it as the “Ophir of the Americas,” a mythical port in the Bible, famed for its riches. The other vision claimed California was hell on earth. José de Gálvez, an energetic and ambitious king's envoy, went to see it by himself. Historical records housed at the Huntington and Bancroft Libraries in California show that Gálvez’s colonization efforts unleashed a heated political debate. This lecture examines the significance of this controversy against the wider context of enlightened reform in the Spanish empire.
 
María Bárbara Zepeda Cortés earned her doctorate and master’s degree in History from the University of Cali-fornia, San Diego, and her bachelor’s degree in International Relations from El Colegio de México. She joined Lehigh’s Department of History in 2013. She is the author of “Cambios y adaptaciones del nacionalismo puer-torriqueño: Del Grito de Lares al Estado Libre Asociado” (Morelia, Mexico: Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo-Fundación Vueltabajo-Editorial Morevalladolid, 2015), which reconstructs the history of na-tionalist movements in Puerto Rico from 1868 to 1952. Zepeda Cortés has presented at conferences in the United States, Mexico, and Spain and she has received a number of research fellowships and awards. Her re-search and teaching interests focus primarily on politics in Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain, and the early modern Atlantic world; and particularly on political culture, corruption, state reform, political social networks, nationalism and identity formation, and U.S.-Caribbean relations. She is currently working on a second book manuscript based on her doctoral dissertation tentatively titled: “The Politics of Reform: José de Gálvez and the Transformation of the Spanish Empire”.
Wednesday, November 1, 2017 - 4:30pm
Roemmele Global Commons, Williams Hall
Latin American & Latino Studies, Spanish Club and Latino Student Alliance 
 
Mexican Day of the Dead Celebration
 
Day of the Dead (Día de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday celebrated throughout Mexico, in particular the Central and South regions, and acknowledged around the world in other cultures. The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died, and help support their spiritual journey. 
 
Face Painting | Refreshments 

 

Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 6:00pm
El Pueblo Se Levanta (1971)
Latin American and Latino Studies program @Lehigh University
Thursday, October 26 @ 6:00 p.m. in Drown 210
50 min film, 10 min Q& A with Dr. Marilisa Jimenez García
 
Watch the documentary film that articulated a movement. In the late 1960s, the
Young Lords Party voiced the plight of the Puerto Rican community in New York in
terms of housing, schooling, and medical care. Poets, writers, artists, and activists
united during the greater Nuyorican Movement.
Wednesday, October 25, 2017 - 4:10pm
STEPS 280
The Independence(s) Lecture Series
 
Children of the Soy: Samanta Schweblin’s Fever Dream and the Gothic Strain in Argentine Culture
Dr. Juan Pablo Dabove
University of Colorado, Boulder
 
The Gothic is nowadays considered one of the defining (indeed, dominant) narrative modes of the modern era. Born out of the anxieties and dilemmas of the advent of Western European (more specifically, English) modernity, it has since become a truly global mode, in all genres, in all media permeating (or polluting) political discourse in topics such as immigration, security, racial relations, and the environment. Indeed, we live in Gothic times.
 
In Dabove’s presentation, he will explore a parcel of that vast territory: postcolonial Argentina. First, he will explore the seemingly baffling fact that, while there has never been, until quite recently, a Gothic literature that identifies itself as such, there has always been a “Gothic Strain” in 
Argentine culture, from the founding fathers of the Argentine nation (e.g. Domingo Faustino Sarmiento), to the present. Secondly, he will present a case study: that of Fever Dream (Distancia de rescate, 2014), as an example of how and why the Gothic is practiced today in Argentina, and what that means in terms of the definition of contemporary Argentine culture. 
 
Juan Pablo Dabove is Professor of Latin American Cultural History at the University of Colorado Boulder. A native of Argentina, he has worked and published extensively on the place of outlaws (in particular rural bandits and rural insurgents) in the Latin American imagination. On this topic he has published Nightmares of the Lettered City: Banditry and Literature in Latin America, 1816-1929 (2007), and Bandit Narratives in Latin America: from Villa to Chavez (2017). He is currently working on a history of the Gothic in postcolonial Argentine literature, film, graphic novel and 
political discourse. 
 
 
 
Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 4:10pm
Zoellner Arts Center, Baker Hall
Join us for a lecture and reading by Wifredo Lam’s great nephew, Juan Castillo Vázquez, in conjunction with the exhibition The Drawings of Wifredo Lam: 1940-1955.  The lecture will take place at 4:10PM in Baker Hall, Zoellner Arts Center.  This is a Spanish language talk with English transcription provided, including excerpts from Wifredo Lam’s poetry.  Reception to follow.  All LUAG events are free and open to the public.
 
LUAG Director/Chief Curator Ricardo Viera reflects on the Castillo Vázquez collection:
I originally saw these drawings in 1997, on my first trip back to my home country in thirty-five years.  I was there as a consultant, part of a team working on the “Cuba Project”, an initiative of the Brandywine Workshop, Philadelphia. Juan Castillo Vázquez, proprietor of the collection, invited us to his home to survey the works left to the family by his great uncle, the artist himself, Wifredo Lam. I was overwhelmed by their power. There is nothing more telling, direct, and inspiring than the eloquence of a drawing. Immediately, I dreamed of bringing a selection of these works to the United States. It was not difficult to choose from among the drawings; they were all transcendent. We planned to present an exhibition at the Brandywine Workshop, and later, on several occasions at LUAG, but permission was denied. I remained
hopeful over the years that we could eventually bring this collection to Lehigh. It took twenty years. Now, for the first time since 1959, twenty-one drawings from a private  collection have come to the United States.
 
Co-sponsored by Latin American and Latino Studies, The Visiting Lecturers Committee and Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.
 
 
Thursday, May 4, 2017 - 4:00pm
Roemmele Global Commons, Williams Hall

Interdisciplinary Programs celebrate Seniors achievements and recognition.

Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 4:10pm
Linderman Library, Room 200
The Independence(s) Lecture Series
 
“Sovereign Parenting” in Affluent Latin American Neighborhoods:  
Race, and the Geopolitics of Childcare 
in Ipanema (Brazil) and El Condado (Puerto Rico) 
 
Dr. Ana Y. Ramos-Zayas 
Professor in the Department of Black and Latino Studies at Baruch College 
and the Department of Psychology (Social Critical Psychology Program) at the CUNY Graduate Center
 
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 • 4:10 PM • Linderman Library, 200
 
Drawing from ethnographic research among parents in the affluent neighborhoods of Ipanema in Brazil and El Condado in Puerto Rico, Ramos-Zayas examines how Latin American urban elites recast understandings of race and class in relation to parenting practices. Ramos-Zayas focuses on how parents viewed their relationship with poor, darker-skin women whom they hired to care for their children. Domestic workers enable parents to teach their children social conventions while simultaneously sustaining their privileged status and whiteness.
 
An anthropologist by training, Ramos-Zayas is also affiliated with the Center for Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies. She occupied the Valentin Lizana y Parrague Endowed Chair in Latin American Studies upon arriving at Baruch in 2012.Ramos-Zayas’ body of work aims to understand and disentangle systems of power and privilege at a variety of scales, ranging from U.S. imperial and white supremacist politics to the ways in which individuals and communities make sense of everyday forms of power and subordination. Issues of social justice and the intersection of intimate worlds and political economic structures are fundamental concerns in her empirical analyses.  
 

 

Monday, November 14, 2016 - 4:10pm
Williams Hall, Room 070

We are accustomed to viewing the evolution of political economy as integrating the political and economic interests of an emerging ruling power.  The Mayan polities of the Classical period in Mesoamerica challenge this concept in that they exhibit a lack of integration between politics and economics, which left ruling families exposed to frequent power challenges and crippled the ability of policies to integrate conquered territories. 

Sunday, November 6, 2016 - 8:00pm
Touchstone Theatre
Wednesday, November 2, 2016 - 4:30pm
Roemmele Global Commons, Williams Hall
Latin American Studies
Spanish Club and Latino Student Alliance 
 
Mexican Day of the Dead 
Join Us For Two Special Events
 
4:30pm
Day of the Dead (Día de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday celebrated throughout Mexico, in particular the Central and South regions, and acknowledged around the world in other cultures. The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died, and help support their spiritual journey.
 
6:00pm
The Book of Life - In the Mexican town of San Angel, Manolo (Diego Luna), Maria (Zoë Saldana) and Joaquin (Channing Tatum) have been friends ever since childhood. Although their lives have taken different paths -- Maria was sent to Europe, Joaquin joined the military, and Manolo studied to become a bullfighter -- one thing remains the same: Manolo and Joaquin both want to marry Maria. Little does the trio know that battling husband-and-wife deities have made a high-stakes wager on the love triangle's outcome. 
 
 
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 - 6:30pm
M Room

Co-sponsored with Office of Multicultural Affairs.

Friday, October 7, 2016 - 12:00pm
Roemmele Global Commons, Williams Hall

Tuesday, September 6, 2016 - 4:10pm
Williams Hall, Roemmele Global Commons

4:15pm to 5:30pm

Interdisciplinary Academic Programs Welcome Back Mixer
Meets 5 x 10 Professional Growth and Success Requirement

Academic Programs
Africana Studies • Global Studies • Classical Studies Cognitive Science • Environmental Studies • Asian Studies Global Citizenship • Science, Technology & Society Health, Medicine & Society • American Studies Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies • Jewish Studies Sustainable Development • Latin American Studies

NEW STUDENTS learn how interdisciplinary studies can enhance your academic goals and declare a major or a minor

CURRENT STUDENTS re-connect with classmates and faculty

FACULTY an opportunity to meet students and answer questions

Light Refreshments Served

Monday, April 25, 2016 - 12:00am
Sinclair Auditorium
LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES FILM SCREENINGS
 
Episode Six  - “Peril and Promise”
Monday, April 25 | 6 pm | Sinclair Auditorium
This episode beings in the 1980s with the sudden arrival of hundreds of thousands of Central Americans fleeing death squads and mass murders at home. By the early 1990s, a political debate over illegal immigration has begun. But change is on the way—the coalescence of a new phenomenon called Latino American culture, as Latinos spread geographically and make their mark in music, sports, politics, business, and education. Is a new world being created? 
 
Discussion following each film screening by a faculty member of the Latin American Studies Program.
 
Co-sponsored by Lower Macungie Library
Latino Americans: 500 Years of History, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, is part of an NEH initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square.
 
Latino Americans: 500 Years of History builds on the PBS documentary film series produced by WETA Washington, D.C.; Bosch and Co., Inc.; and Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB); in association with Independent Television Service (ITVS). 
Monday, April 18, 2016 - 12:00am
Sinclair Auditorium
LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES FILM SCREENINGS
Episode Five - “Prejudice and Pride”
Monday, April 18 | 6 pm | Sinclair Auditorium
This episode begins in the 1960s and 1970s when a generation of Mexican Americans, frustrated by persistent discrimination and poverty, find a new way forward through social action and the building of a new “Chicano” identity. Watch as activists fight for change and see how Chicano activism and identity have transformed what it means to be an American. 
 
Discussion following each film screening by a faculty member of the Latin American Studies Program.
 
Co-sponsored by Lower Macungie Library
Latino Americans: 500 Years of History, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, is part of an NEH initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square.
 
Latino Americans: 500 Years of History builds on the PBS documentary film series produced by WETA Washington, D.C.; Bosch and Co., Inc.; and Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB); in association with Independent Television Service (ITVS). 

 

Wednesday, April 13, 2016 - 12:00am
Linderman Library, Room 200

The Independence(s) Series
“From Teonanácatl to Miami Vice: Latin America's Contribution to World Drug Culture”
Dr. Paul Gootenberg Distinguished Professor of History and Sociology, Stony Brook University

Long before today’s entanglements with coke, meth, and weed, the Americas were a proving ground of global drug cultures. This millennium of shamanistic and Aztec psychedelics, colonial and Atlantic stimulants such as coffee and tobacco, national drug goods like tequila and coca, preceded the menacing 20th-century explosion of illicit drug trafficking, and shed light on our changing relationships to mind drugs and their commerce.

Professor Gootenberg’s research and graduate training interests span most of modern Latin America, with special strengths in Andean and Mexican history and in questions of historical sociology. His current writing centers around the history of drug commodities, especially Andean cocaine as a global drug.  He is also interested in historical dimensions of Latin American inequalities. Gootenberg helped to establish Stony Brook’s innovative interdepartmental workshop, the Initiative in Historical Social Sciences (IHSS), and serves as a coordinator of the monthly New York Latin American History Workshop, which brings together students and faculty from Columbia, NYU, CUNY and Stony Brook. He is also active in a number of interdisciplinary research programs at the (Brooklyn-based) Social Science Research Council (SSRC).  

Wednesday, March 30, 2016 - 12:00am

Wednesday, March 30, 2014
10:00 AM - 3:30 PM
Linderman Library
Scheler Forum for the Humanities, Room 200
Lehigh Unversity
Free/No Registration Required
Lunch is NOT included

Co-sponsors
* Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
* Global Studies Program

 

Printable Poster

This conference includes a two-part panel centering on the concept of borders from the persepctive of both aesthetics and social analysis.

10:00am Panel 1: Border Aesthetics 
Moderator: Leticia Robles-Moreno, New York University, Performance Studies 

Utopia and sexual encounters in the Amazonian frontier: reading Roger Casement's Black Diaries
Javier Uriarte, Stony Brook University, Spanish

(Documentary) Photography and its Limits
Ángeles Donoso Macaya, CUNY Borough of Manhattan Community College, Spanish

Surviving Mexico: The Central American Migrants' Journey on Film
Nanci Buiza, Swarthmore College, Spanish

Before the border, the border: México and the Central American migrant in “La fila India” by Antonio Ortuño
Miguel Pillado, Lehigh University, Spanish

1:45pm Panel 2: Border Socialities
Moderator: Bárbara Zepeda, Lehigh University, History

Whiteness, Choledad, and New Elites in Neoliberal Peru
Ulla Berg, Rutgers University, Anthropology

Deaths, (In)Visibility, and Responsibility: The Politics of Mourning at the U.S.-Mexico Border
Alexandra Delano, The New School, Global Studies/Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility
Benjamin Nienass, California State University at San Marcos, Political Science

Crafting Difference and Constructing Boundaries: A Discussion of Latin American Migration to Chile
Megan Sheehan, Lehigh University, Anthropology

A Not so Fluid Border: Race and Class in Mexico
Hugo Ceron-Anaya, Lehigh University, Sociology

Wednesday, March 9, 2016 - 12:00am
Williams Hall-Roemmele Global Commons
Wednesday, February 10, 2016 - 12:00am
STEPS 290
Wednesday, October 7, 2015 - 10:30pm
Maginnes Hall, Room113

Un cuento chino 

(Chinese Take-Out) (2011)

Director Sebastián Borenzstein

FREE Film Screening for LU Students/Faculty/Staff ONLY

In Buenos Aires, the bitter and methodic Roberto is a lonely man and the owner of a hardware store. One day, Roberto sees a Chinese named Jun being expelled from a taxi. Jun does not speak Spanish and shows a tattoo with an address on his arm.. Roberto goes with Jun to the police station, to the China's embassy and to a Chinese neighborhood to seek out his uncle but it is a fruitless search. 

Roberto lodges Jun in his house and after a series of incidents, he finds a delivery boy to translate Jun and he learns the dramatic story of his life. (imdb.com)

Discussant: Instructor Eunice Cortez

Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

Tuesday, September 29, 2015 - 10:30pm
Maginnes Hall, Room113

Who Is Dayani Cristal? (2013)

Director Marc Silver

FREE Film Screening for LU Students/Faculty/Staff ONLY

This award-winning documentary tells the story of a migrant who found himself in the deadly stretch of desert along the U.S. – Mexico border.  The film follows a team of dedicated staff from the Pima County Medical Examiner’s Office, as they seek to identify this anonymous man.  As the forensic investigation unfolds, Gabriel García Bernal retraces this man’s steps along the migrant trail in Central America.  Who Is Dayani Cristal? highlights the often untold human stories behind the debates over immigration. (whoisdayanicristal.com) 

Discussant: Megan Sheehan

Department of Sociology and Anthropology and a Latin American Predoctoral Fellow

Thursday, September 24, 2015 - 4:10pm
University Center, Room 207C

As part of the Gender in a Global Context Discussion Series hosted by the Women's Center we present Child, Bride and Mother? This discussion focuses on the unspoken issues involving child marriages and pregnancies in South America. Is this a common tradition in other countries as well? Join us on September 24 in UC c207 from 12:10pm-1pm. 

Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 10:30pm
Maginnes Hall, Room113

Juan de los muertos

(Juan of the Dead) (2011) 

Director, Directed by Alejandro Brugués

FREE Film Screening for LU Students/Faculty/Staff ONLY

Juan is 40 years old, most of which he spent in Cuba doing absolutely nothing. Juan's only emotional tie is his daughter, Camila, a 

beautiful young girl that doesn't want anything to do with her father because the only thing he's good at is getting into trouble. Suddenly some strange things start to happen, people are turning violent 

attacking one to the other. Juan was first convinced it's just another stage of the Revolution. Little by little Juan and his friends start to realize that the attackers are not normal human beings and that 

killing them is quite a difficult task. They're not vampires, they're not possesed, but they're definitely not dissidents; a simple bite turns the victim into other violent killing machine and the only way to beat them is destroying their brains. Juan decides that the best way of 

facing the situation is making some money out of it.....

(C) Official Film Site

Discussant: Assistant Professor Miguel Pillado

Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

Tuesday, June 30, 2015 - 4:00am
Main Art Gallery, Zoellner Arts Center, Lehigh University
PRE-COLUMBIAN ARTIFACTS
Now through June 30, 2015
The term "Pre-Columbian" has expanded to include the period before before indigenous cultures came under the control and influence of Europe, sometimes decades and even centuries after Columbus' arrival in 1492.  These objects provide a glimpse into the daily life of Pre-Columbian peoples, including the Chavín, Nazca, Moche, Tairona, Chimú, Taíno, and Inca.  This exhibition is a project of Advanced Museum Studies students: Susan Wigodner '10, Alex Doersam '12 and Idelis Matias '12.
Monday, May 25, 2015 - 3:50am
Main Art Gallery, Zoellner Arts Center, Lehigh University

January 21 through May 24, 2015
Syncretisms in Contemporary Cuban Photography

Saturday, April 18, 2015 - 10:10pm
Packard 101
Wednesday, April 8, 2015 - 10:00pm
Maginnes Hall, Room 113

The LAS Film Series - Free/Open to ONLY Lehigh University Faculty/Staff/Students
Discussant: Assistant Professor Barbara Zepeda, Department of History

Friday, April 3, 2015 - 11:00pm
Baker Hall, Zoellner Arts Center
Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 8:10pm
Maginnes 102
 

 

Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 10:00pm
Maginnes Hall, Room 260

The LAS Film Series - Free/Open to ONLY Lehigh University Faculty/Staff/Students
Discussant: Assistant Professor Javier Puente, Department of History

Thursday, March 26, 2015 - 8:10pm
STEPS 280

Speaker: Dr. Vanessa Perez-Rosario

Wednesday, March 25, 2015 - 10:00pm
Maginnes Hall, Room 113

The LAS Film Series - Free/Open to ONLY Lehigh University Faculty/Staff/Students
Discussant: Assistant Professor Miguel Pillado, Department of MLL

Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 8:10pm
Linderman Library, Room 200

Speaker: Dr. J. Andrew Brown

Thursday, November 13, 2014 - 9:10pm
Maginnes Hall, Room 113
Village Peru: Andean Livelihood, Territoriality, and Campesino Politics in an Age of Terror, 1980-1990
Speaker: Javier Puente-Valdivia, Postdoctoral Fellow, Latin American Studies and Department of History
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 - 10:00pm
STEPS 101
The LAS Film Series - Free/Open to the Public
Discussant: Assistant Professor Matthew Bus, Director of Latin American Studies, Department of MLL
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 - 10:00pm
Maginnes Hall, Room 111
The LAS Film Series - Free/Open to ONLY Lehigh University Faculty/Staff/Student
Discussant: Postdoctoral Fellow, Javier Puente, Department of History
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 - 10:00pm
Maginnes Hall, Room 111
The LAS Film Series - Free/Open to ONLY Lehigh University Faculty/Staff/Students
Discussant: Assistant Professor Miguel Pillado, Department of MLL
Wednesday, October 8, 2014 - 10:00pm
Maginnes Hall, Room 111
The LAS Film Series - Free/Open to ONLY Lehigh University Faculty/Staff/Students
Discussant: Assistant Professor Barbara Zepeda, Department of History
Thursday, September 25, 2014 - 8:10pm
Sinclair Auditorium
The Independence(s) Lecture Series
Co-sponsors: Lehigh University Art Galleries, Department of Art, Architecture & Design and Department of Modern Languages & Literatures.
Tuesday, November 5, 2013 - 11:00pm
STEPS 180

Speakers: James B. Peterson, Director of Africana Studies and Wilfredo Gomez

Thursday, October 31, 2013 - 8:10pm
Linderman Library, 200

Speaker: Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Professor, Columbia University

Wednesday, September 18, 2013 - 8:00pm
Sinclair Auditorium

A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and the People That Make Our Clothes

Organized by South Mountain College with sponsorship from: Asian Studies, Environmental Initiative, Ethics Series, Global Studies, Humanities Center, Latin American Studies program, Library Speaker Series, Office of Sustainability, Religion Studies, Sociology and Anthropology, Sustainable Development, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

Monday, September 16, 2013 - 10:30pm
Packard Lab 101

Photography Exhibit - 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM • STEPS Concourse


Lecture - 6:30 PM • Packard Lab 101


Jose Galvez, the leading documentary photographer of Latino life in America, will be showcasing an exhibit documenting Latino and Hispanic life  and culture since the 1960s, specifically immigration. He will discuss as well as showcase the journey that millions of undocumented people have undertaken.

© IMRC CAS 2016

Latin American Studies  |  101 Williams Hall  |  31 Williams Drive
Bethlehem, PA 18015  |  phone 610-758-3996  |  fax 610-758-2131