Major and Minor in Latin American Studies

The major and minor in Latin American and Latino Studies are designed for students who wish to develop an understanding of a neighboring region that is of vital importance to the United States, as well as Latino cultures in our country. Courses in archeology, foreign policy, history, politics, language and literature allow students to explore various aspects of Latin American and U.S. Latino cultures and societies from different disciplinary perspectives. The major and minor contribute to a liberal arts education by offering students an international and intercultural vantage point from which they can examine their own society, preparing them to meet the challenges of an increasingly interdependent world. Additionally, the unprecedented movement of peoples and ideas between the American continents in recent decades makes the study of this region of the world an essential component for understanding the history and culture of the expanding U.S. Latino population. The major and minor in Latin American and Latino Studies complement the study of other disciplines that have either an international or a domestic focus, and it enhances the relevance of a Lehigh education by preparing students to be citizens of a culturally diversity society and, more generally, of the Americas.

Career Paths
Students completing the major or minor in Latin American and Latino Studies can find careers both in Latin America and working with Latino populations in the United States. Latin American and Latino Studies students are equipped to compete in the job market and for admittance to graduate school. The possibilities are endless! 
Business
Education
Government
Public Service
Non-governmental Organizations


The Major

The major in Latin American and Latino Studies requires a minimum of 10 courses (or 30 credit hours) and no less than four upper level courses. Students are required to possess intermediate language proficiency in Spanish.

In addition to regular Lehigh offerings, students may receive credit for appropriate courses at other LVAIC institutions, study abroad programs in Latin America, and various Lehigh-faculty-led programs, such as “Lehigh in Martinique,” “Lehigh in Costa Rica” (both offered during the winter term), and “Lehigh in Honduras” (summer).  Students are encouraged to take advantage of extracurricular activities sponsored by the Latin American and Latino Studies Program, which include guest speakers and exhibits.

For further information or to coordinate your minor program, students should contact Professor Matthew Bush, Director, Latin American Studies Program, 31 Williams Hall Room 423 or matthew.bush@lehigh.edu or 610-758-3087. Downloadable major declaration form is available or visit the Office of Interdisciplinary Programs, 31 Williams Hall, Suite 101.

Lehigh University Course Catalog

A. Required Core Course (4 credits)

  • HIST 049. Colonial Latin America (4)
  • HIST 050. Modern Latin America (4)
  • SPAN 152. Cultural Evolution of Latin America (4) (taught in Spanish)

B. Language Requirement (4 credits)

  • SPAN 012. Intermediate Spanish II (4)

C. Humanities Requirement1,2  (8 credits)
    Two classes from the list of electives that carry a HU distribution. 

D. Social Sciences Requirement1,2 (8 credits)
    Two classes from the list of electives that carry a SS distribution. 

E. Additional Electives1, 2 (16 credits)
    Elective courses (16 credits). Choose courses from this list
    Additional electives may be chosen in consultation with the Program Director.

Total Credits 40

1 No less than three courses in Latino Studies.

2 Only two upper-level courses may be taken in Spanish


The Minor

The minor program requires 15 to 16 credit hours of coursework.  In addition to regular Lehigh offerings, students may receive credit for appropriate courses at other LVAIC institutions, study abroad programs in Latin America, and various Lehigh-faculty-led programs, such as “Lehigh in Martinique,” “Lehigh in Costa Rica” (both offered during the winter term), and “Lehigh in Honduras” (summer).  Students are encouraged to take advantage of extracurricular activities sponsored by the Latin American and Latino Studies Program, which include guest speakers and exhibits.

For further information or to coordinate your minor program, students should contact Professor Matthew Bush, Director, Latin American Studies Program, 31 Williams Hall Room 423 or matthew.bush@lehigh.edu or 610-758-3087. A downloadable minor declaration form will be available soon, or visit the Office of Interdisciplinary Programs, 31 Williams Hall, Suite 101.

Lehigh University Course Catalog

Requirements Core Courses (8 credits)

A. History/Culture (4 credits). Choose one of the following:

  • HIST 049. History of Latin America (4)
  • HIST 050. History of Latin America (4)
  • SPAN 152. The Cultural Evolution of Latin America (4) (taught in Spanish)

​B. Language (4 credits)

  • Spanish 012. Intermediate Spanish II (4)

C. Elective Courses (7-8 credits)
    Elective courses (7-8 credits). Choose courses from this list.
    Credit may be received for other courses, in consultation with the Program Director.

Total Credits 15-16


Spring 2019 Courses
University Catalog

SPAN 012-010  Intermediate Spanish II (HU) 
CRN multiple sections / 4 credits / LAS / Prof. Cortez
Refer to class schedule for section times.
Prerequisite: SPAN 011 or equivalent.   
 
LAS, GS, HIST 050-010  Heroes, Dictators, and Revolutionaries: Latin America since Independence (SS) 
CRN 18846 / 4 credits / CBE Global / T, R 9:20 - 10:35 p.m. / Prof. Zepeda Cortes
Examines the 200-year-long struggle of Latin American peoples to gain political representation, economic equality and social justice. Explores key historical events in Latin America from the movement for independence in the early nineteenth century to today's modern societies. Topics include the wars of independence, the rule of caudillos, foreign military interventions, export economies, populism, social revolutions, the Cold War era, state terror and military dictatorships, and the war on drugs.   
 
LAS, HIST 098-010  American Rebellions, Revolutions, and Republics (HU) 
CRN 18903 / 4 credits / T, R 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. / Staff
This course traces the underlying causes and the consequences of political movements—rebellions, revolutions, and the creation of republics—in North America, the Caribbean, and South America from the beginning of European colonization through the American Civil War. Through a series of case studies, it examines the rise and fall of American empires, and the historical transition from the pre-modern to the modern world from the perspective of European-descended colonists, Native Americans, and African slaves. Our goal is to analyze the differences between rebellions and revolutions, why they transpired in specific places at specific times, and how/why new sovereign polities emerged from European empires. Topics include colonial rebellions/warfare, American Constitutional debates, western borderlands empires/republics, and nationalism and sovereignty.   
 
LAS, ENGL 105-010  Intro to Latino/a Literature and Culture (HU) 
CRN 19250 / 4 credits / CBE Diversity / M, W 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. / Prof. Jiminez
In “Hurricane,” from the hit musical Hamilton (2015) Lin-Manuel Miranda sings the lyrics, “I wrote my way out.” In the context, Miranda, the son of a Puerto Rican father and Italian mother, is singing as Alexander Hamilton, and the various ways Hamilton used his writing talents to personal, professional, and political opportunities for himself. However, the lyric also speaks to Miranda’s place as a Latino/a male rewriting traditions and creating new ones—a common theme in Latino/a writing and culture in the United States. 
This course provides an overview of the literary history and criticism of Latino/a literature and media. Through a combination of critical and literary theory, we will focus on works Latino/a-centered texts including poetry, prose, film, and television which portray issues of migration/immigration, colonialism, history, race, and gender. We will also examine the role of literature in the development of Latino/a Studies. Authors and scholars featured in the course include José Martí, Pura Belpré, Pedro Pietri, the Young Lords Party, and Gloria Anzaldua. Some questions that will inform our readings of these texts:
1) How do Latino/a writers incorporate and revise U.S. and Latin American literary traditions?
2) How does the organization of Latino/a literature present challenges to U.S. canon formation?
Assignments include a short written analysis of a text (5 pages) and a longer, research project (8-10 pages) which can take the form of a research paper, teaching plan, or multimedia video. The interactive format (lecture, small group discussion, in-class writing) of this course will also require students active participation.   
 
LAS, AAS, SOC 106-010  Race and Ethnicity in the Americas (SS) 
CRN 19161 / 4 credits / CBE Diversity / M, W 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. / Prof. Ceron
How is it possible that someone who is officially considered black in the United States can embody different racial identities throughout current Latin America? Even more, how is it possible that people considered white nowadays were not officially so in early twentieth-century US (although they were viewed as white in the Latin American context at the same time period)? This course offers a historical comparative analysis of the nature and dynamics of race between the United States and Latin America.   
 
LAS, SPAN, 152-010  The Cultural Evolution of Latin America (HU) 
CRN 16095 / 4 credits / CBE Global / M, W 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. / Prof. Bush
The historical and cultural evolution of Latin America. Discussion of representative literary works in their cultural and historical contexts. Prerequisite: SPAN 141 or consent of instructor.   
 
LAS, SPAN 211-010  Business Spanish (HU) 
Department permission required. Pre-requisite SPAN 141
CRN 19065 / 4 credits / CBE Global / M, W 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. / Prof. Prieto
An introduction to business concepts and vocabulary in Spanish. Specialized professional vocabulary and business culture in Spanish-speaking countries.   
 
LAS, SPAN 213-010  Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Film (HU) 
Pre-requisite SPAN 141.
CRN 18072 / 4 credits / CBE Global / T,R 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. / Prof. Munoz
An introduction to the analysis of Latin American and Spanish cultural productions.   
 
IR 323-010  Political Economy of Industrialization and Development (SS) 
Prerequisite IR 010 and IR 125.  Department permission required.
CRN 18356 / 4 credits / M, W 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. / Prof. Duvanova
Political foundation and consequences of economic development and growth. Global inequality in the rates and levels of economic development. Analysis of the differences between the development strategies adopted in different parts of the world. Explanations for patterns of success and failure. Origins of underdevelopment; the politics of failed development strategies; the challenge of the increasingly competitive world economy and relations with the U.S. and other developed nations.   
 
ENGL 384-010  New Brown American: Race and Identity in the 21st Century (HU) 
CRN 19135 / 4 credits / CBE Diversity / T, R 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. / Prof. Singh
What does it mean to be brown in America in 2019? How have recent historical events -- from 9/11 to the election of Donald Trump -- impacted the status of immigrant communities? This course will explore a range of contemporary texts from popular culture, including novels, films, stand-up comedy albums, and musical recordings, all of which explore the changing nature of identity. Many of our primary texts will explore points of intersection between different ethic and racial groups, including black/Latino/Asian intersections, multiracial identities, and the broad, trans-racial appropriation of hip hop culture. We will also read from critical race theorists who will help students develop a conceptual vocabulary to engage these issues. Starting points will be material by Hasan Minhaj, Mindy Kaling, Eddie Huang, Rupi Kaur, and Mohsin Hamid. Students will be encouraged to bring their own interests and suggested materials to the course. 
 

 

Fall 2018 Courses
University Catalog

SPAN 012-10 Intermediate Spanish II (HU) CRN 40640 / 4 credits / Prof. Brandt, M, W, F; 11:10 - 12:00 p.m.
 
SPAN 012-11 Intermediate Spanish II (HU) CRN 41485 / 4 credits / Prof. Reuben, M, W, F; 1:10 - 2:00 p.m.
 
GS, LAS, HIST 049-10 The True Road to El Dorado: Colonial Latin America (SS) CRN 44517 / 4 credits / CBE Global
Prof. Zepeda Cortes, M, W; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m.
 
SOC 115-10 A Nation of Immigrants: The American Experience (SS) CRN 44513 / 4 credits 
Prof. Ceron Anaya, T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.
 
LAS, HIST 149-10 Narcos: Global Drug Wars (SS) CRN 44913 / 4 credits / CBE Global 
Prof. Zepeda Cortes, M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.
Tobacco, sugar, coffee, opium, marijuana, cocaine. From Columbus’s encounter with the New World to the rise and demise of Pablo Escobar and “El Chapo” Guzmán, drugs have been coveted global commodities. Through readings, discussions, and films, this course examines the history of drug production, drug trafficking, and the so-called “war on drugs” in Latin America.
 
SPAN, LAS 152-10 The Cultural Evolution of Latin America (HU) Department permission required Pre-requisite SPAN 141 CRN 41674 / 4 credits / CBE Global
Prof. Prieto, M, W; 12:45 - 2: 00 p.m.
 
SPAN, LAS 263-10 Spanish Am Short Story (HU) CRN 44011 / 4 credits / CBE Global 
Prof. Bush, M, Wl 11:10 - 12:25 p.m.
 
LAS/SPAN 307-10 Border Crossers: The Migrant Experience in Contemporary Mexican & Central American Literature (HU) CRN 44318 / 4 credits
Prof. Pillado, T, R; 1:10 – 2:25 p.m.
 
JOUR 325-14 Journalism & Democracy (SS) CRN 43899 / 4 credits
Prof. De Maio, T, R; 1:10 - 2:35 p.m.
Around the world, including in the United States, journalism is under attack.  Yet, we are told, journalism is essential to democracy.  Our democracy depends on having well-informed citizens to make political decisions that are in line with their interests.  Yet, daily, we are bombarded by information coming from many different sources.  People not only must decide what to consume but also sources of information they should trust.  In this course, we look at the connections between media, public opinion, and politics.  We also discuss what the role of journalism should be in the consolidation of democracies around the world.
 

 

Spring 2018 Courses
University Catalog

SPAN 012  Intermediate Spanish II (HU) 4 credits 
Section 10- 10291    M, W, F; 10:10 - 11:00 a.m. 
Section 11- 10292    M, W, F; 11:10 -12:00 p.m. 
Professor Cortez 
 
HIST 049-10  Colonial Latin America (SS) CBE Global  4 credits 14236
Professor Zepeda Cortes M, W; 11:10 - 12:25 p.m.
 
LAS, SPAN 152-10  The Cultural Evolution of Latin America (HU) CBE Global  4 credits 11721
Professor Prieto T, R; 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. (MLL department permission required)
 
LAS, ES, SOC 195-10  Mining, Conflict & Revolution in Latin America (SS) CBE Global  4 credits 14001
From the Colonial period to present day, mining has shaped Latin America’s political, economic, social and cultural development.  This course will explore mineral and metallic mining in Latin America over the last five centuries, focusing on international trade, slavery, labor struggles, political conflict, Revolution, environmental impacts, indigenous social movements, and how mining impacts gender relations.  We will also examine the mines that the Mighty Bethlehem Steel owned in Cuba, Chile and Venezuela, tying the course content to our hometown of Bethlehem. This course will provide a useful introduction to Latin American history, political economy and current affairs through an interdisciplinary approach that examines race, class, and gender. This course is ideal for students interested in sustainable development, environmental studies, critical race theory, gender studies, international relations and social movements; it is also ideal for environmental engineers and business students who want to learn more about the social, political and cultural context of extractive industries. 
Professor Fisher-Hoffman M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 
 
LAS, ANTH 196-10  Food, Migration, and Culture (SS)   4 credits 14094
Tacos, bánh mì, and bagels are products encountered everyday in the United States; their cultural significance has been shaped by centuries of migration that continue to impact our palettes and cityscapes. This course draws from interdisciplinary scholarship to examine concepts like gentrification, labor, authenticity, and hybridity, with a focus on Latinx foodways. Students will develop skills in qualitative methodology and gain a critical theoretical lens into cultural production and consumption of foodways. 
Professor Fouts T, R; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 
 
LAS 197-10  Introduction to Latin American and Latino Studies (SS) CBE Global  4 credits 12730
By introducing students to the interdisciplinary fields of Latin American and Latino Studies, this course examines trends in scholarship and explores the historical origins of contemporary issues across the Americas with a focus on neoliberalism, labor, and migration. This course is designed to challenge dominant narratives by highlighting voices of underrepresented groups, building on key concepts like power, race, transnationalism, intersectionality, and globalization. 
Professor Fouts T, R; 9:20-10:35 a.m. 
 
LAS, JOUR 198-10  Latino and Latin American Media (SS) CBE Global  4 credits 13078
This course provides students an intro to Latino and Latin American media.  The cultures, languages, and traditions of Spanish-language and Latino media in the U.S. and globally will be examined.  The course presents frameworks for understanding media development and performance, discusses the role of media in democratic societies, and identifies common patterns in Latin American media ownership, media-state relationships, relations with societal groups and citizens and media content.  Students learn to identify and analyze societal and international forces that help explain why these patterns appear, persevere, and sometimes change.
Professor DeMaio T, R; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 
 
LAS, HIST 198-11  Global Drug Wars (HU) CBE Global  4 credits 14337
Tobacco, sugar, coffee, opium, marijuana, cocaine. From Columbus’s encounter with the New World to the rise and demise of Pablo Escobar and “El Chapo” Guzmán, drugs have been coveted global commodities. Through readings, discussions, and films, this course examines the history of drug production, drug trafficking, and the so-called “war on drugs” in Latin America.  
Professor Zepeda Cortes M, W; 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. 
 
LAS, SPAN 213-10  Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Film (HU) CBE Global  4 credits 14318
Professor Pillado T, R; 1:10 - 2:25 p.m.
 
LAS, SPAN 265-10  Spanish and Latin American Cinema (HU) CBE Global  4 credits 12695 
An introduction to cinema in the Spanish-speaking world. Oral discussion and written analysis of selected films. Students view films independently. Prerequisite: SPAN 141 or equivalent. (MLL department permission required)
Professor Prieto M, W; 12:45 - 2:00 p.m.
 

Archived Courses

Fall 2017 Courses
Spring 2017 Courses
Fall 2016 Courses
Spring 2016 Courses
Fall 2015 Courses
Spring 2015 Courses
Fall 2014 Courses
Spring 2014 Courses
Fall 2013 Courses
Spring 2013 Courses
Fall 2012 Courses
Spring 2012 Courses

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Latin American Studies  |  101 Williams Hall  |  31 Williams Drive
Bethlehem, PA 18015  |  phone 610-758-3996  |  fax 610-758-2131